Monday, May 25, 2020

The Origin Of The Bible Essay - 2203 Words

After a number of years have passed through the church, one would wonder how we can be certain that the right books make up the Bible. We have all of these translations and interpretations of Scripture, but how did we get the Bible itself? These are the many questions that make up many non-believers and possibly even many non believers today as well. I can speak for many church goers on the contrary, that have grown up in the church and they have not thought about the idea of the origin of the Bible. Either way, Christian or atheist, it is important to understand the origin of one s beliefs. This leads to the basis of the foundation of why a Christian believes the truth of God’s word and then is able to faith their faith with others. To begin our research, it is important to understand and define some of the terms that are displayed throughout the text. First off, the origin of the word â€Å"canon† comes from the Latin word canon. This was originally from the Greek word kanon. When translated into English this word is referred to as a â€Å"standard† or type of â€Å"rule† that is found in 2 Corinthians 10:13 and again in Galatians 6:16. It is important to note that when Paul is writing, he is not referring to the canon of Scripture. This word came into be for the canon of scripture at a much later date when the Christian church called â€Å"kanon† stood for the rule of faith and revealed truth. In the fourth century, the church referred to the Scriptures of both the Old Testaments and theShow MoreRelatedOriginal Creation of Earth1117 Words   |  5 Pagesthe earth came into being. An eruption of sorts occurred, haphazardly distributing the smallest particles of matter that miraculou sly adjoined themselves to create living, breathing organisms and every other object on the earth. Every word of the Bible is true. Every day, creation scientists are finding more and more evidence to support the six days of creation. There is nothing wrong with science, but in the end it is the fallible word of man. YOUNG EARTH At its simplest, evolution is a hypothesisRead MoreEssay on Creation vs. Evolution in the Public Schools1342 Words   |  6 Pagescreation nor evolutionary concepts can be proven with irrefutable evidence. However, regardless of the inability to prove either concept, most public school systems promote evolution as a scientific fact. Many students who lack firm beliefs about the origin of life believe what they are taught without giving any personal thought to the matter. Instead of robotically absorbing biased information, schools should present information about evolution and creation to students and promote a ‘self-deciding’Read MoreHow Charles Darwin Changed the World Forever1409 Words   |  6 PagesThere is one man in history who changed everything from the way we see everyday events in the world, and that man is Charles Darwin. Charles Darwin was a scientist who discovered the origin of life through a study on the Galapagos Islands. Before Darwin’s dis covery, the world was looked upon as God’s playground where everything happened because of him. For example, if something bad happened to someone’s family like a disease it would be because they have angered God. Darwin lived during the dawnRead MoreEssay about The Study of Anthropology and the Humanities1361 Words   |  6 PagesThe humanities are a broad multidisciplinary field of study where its disciplines aren’t in just one department. Therefore, studying the humanities correlates to the study of anthropology. Simply put, anthropology is the study of humanity and the origins of human beings. Learning about the humanities can help those studying anthropology because the humanities looks into understanding and exploring the human condition. There is an idea of culture that is used to describe what humans do. AnthropologyRead MoreContradiction Between the Theory of Evolution and the Bible947 Words   |  4 Pagespublished a book call The Origin of Species. This book was the beginning of what we know about evolution, and it was controversial. The book brought disputations between devoted christians and darwinists on the validity of evolution. During that period of time, most Europeans believed that the world was created by God in seven days and thought evolution was challenging the existence of God. Darwin’s theory of evolution challenges traditional beliefs by contradicting the bible. Even though Darwin tookRead MoreEssay about Biblical Numerology 1142 Words   |  5 Pagesliterature but none are comparable to the Bible. This book not only hold acataleptic knowledge that can impact the world but also is a compendium for many peoples life. It has become a symbolic representation of many Christians faith and continues as one today. The Bible has many forms of symbolism not only in itself but also in the pages. Biblical numerology is one form of symbolism that appears though out the Bible. This paper will explore the origins of s ymbolic numbers, the development of theRead MoreSolo And Sola Scriptur Two Protestant Positions1461 Words   |  6 Pagessomething is infallible it is incapable of making mistakes or being wrong. Sola Scriptura is the teaching that the only infallible thing is the Bible. In both of these Scripture is a main part of the beliefs which is why the way that the Scripture is analyzed is important. Some of the traditions that come from traditions come from history and the origin of the Scripture. The Historical Critical Method is the comparing of text with other text from the same region and time period which would affectRead MoreBiblical Bible : Biblical Worldview Essay892 Words   |  4 Pageshave a discussion. They start to talk about different things happening in the world and how they view them. They talked about how the world begin, how to treat people, and much more. This conversation went on for a while and Sara was using the Bible to back-up what she was saying, while Joanna had nothing to support what she believed in. Sara had a biblical worldview. What Is A Worldview A worldview is the frame of what someone believe and bases their opinions (Hindson Caner, 2008). The wordRead MorePaper 2 - the Rise of Fundamentalism1726 Words   |  7 Pages-------------------------------------------2 THE RISE OF FUNDAMENTALISM -------------------------------------------------------------------- THE CHRISTIAN REACTION TO DARWINISM AND OTHER SCIENTIFIC THEORIES— THE RISE OF HIGHER CRITICISM OF THE BIBLE-------------------------------------------------- THE SOCIAL GOSPEL--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- THE FUNDAMENTALS------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Read More Evolutionism Vs Creationism Essay1050 Words   |  5 Pages nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Questions on the origin of life and of the universe must have challenged human curiosity and imagination as soon as early man had time for activities other than survival. In 1859, Charles Darwin published the Origin of Species, and since then, people have debated between the creationism and evolutionism theories. The theory of evolution has been supported only through various religious writings, particularly the Bible. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Creationists believe

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Ispahan Carpet - 1180 Words

Ispahan Carpet Ispahan Carpet explores the writer’s emotions and feelings about the children sitting in the hut all day, weaving with ‘unsupported bird-bones’. This would be somewhere in the middle east, as carpets are very well done there and done by hand which makes it very much more authentic and valuable. People who make these carpets are usually in poverty as they slave away in their huts for at least 6-8 months making one decent sized carpet. The poem describes what goes on in the hut and how sympathetic one would get as the poem then broadens views of the world and how this has an impact on the writer. The poem creates a view of inside the hut, and how a Persian family sits on ‘rough timber gallows’ to weave the carpets. The†¦show more content†¦The thought of having people walking, rubbing dirty feet on beautifully made carpets that take such an incredible amount of effort to make puts even more sympathy in for those children. The structure of the poem resembles something like a magnifying glass, looking closer and closer into the situation. The first stanza concentrates on the atmosphere and the people in the hut, going into the second stanza, the readers get a closer look to the children that are producing these carpets and how the resemble old women with their ‘unsupported bird-bones’. The third stanza goes deeper, it looks into the carpet and how much effort and precision goes into producing the carpet also the significance of ‘one hundred knots in the space of my thumb-nail’ really shows the readers how much sacrifice goes into one carpet. The fourth stanza, portrays the writers realisation of her life and how much more fortunate she is compared. The structure of the poem doesn’t just magnify on the situation but also on the readers as we empathise for the children. The importance of lines 18-20 really takes the poem into another view. â€Å"O, eyes whose whole horizon is the carpet†, the poem grasps the idea of these children just sitting there weaving and understands that since that making carpet is their only source of moneyShow MoreRelatedTabriz and Carpet1419 Words   |  6 Pages1. (a) - Riya Didwania Elizabeth Burge’s poem â€Å"Ispahan Carpet† is an extended metaphor which aims to compare the beauty of the traditional Persian carpet (known as the Ispahan carpet) to the appalling conditions in which the carpet makers are forced to dwell. The central theme of the poem is to emphasize on the exploitation of children which is prevalent in various parts of the world. This leads to the end of all the hope and optimism that ever prevailed in the lives of theRead MoreCharacteristics Of Agra Crafts1213 Words   |  5 Pagesconstitutes carpet weaving, zari-zardozi, inlay and marble carving (agra.nic.in). (Swaroop, 1996), elucidated in his book, that in olden times Indians considered handicrafts as the channel of liberation of souls. According to him handicrafts are the real expression of divine and physical prospects of the community. As stated in research report that at present there are 7200 small scale handicrafts units are functioning in Agra, which are providing employment to approximately 13000 Carpet, Inlay and

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Relationship Between Dodie s Character And The White...

One of the most important links between Dodie’s character and the white race as a whole lies in his physical features and attributes. Soon after Dodie is born, Mammy Jane notices a mole behind his ear. She grudgingly concludes that Dodie â€Å"should die by judicial strangulation†¦nevertheless, the warning was a serious thing and not to be lightly disregarded.† (Chesnutt, 10) The irony of her prediction is phenomenal, especially considering the conclusion of the novel. The white community, much like Dodie, was threatened by a similar great danger: the threat of an equal black community. At the same time, the threat was taken seriously, with upmost precaution to make sure that both Dodie and the white race were â€Å"saved† from the potential consequences. It is for that reason that Major Carteret works diligently with doctors to ensure his sons life twice in the novel, while at the same time working with General Belmont and Captain McBane to ensure that the black community had no means of rising to office or any other position in society. Thus, just as Dodie is ultimately protected by the influential people around him, the white race is protected from the black race by the white elite. Beyond the physical attributes, Dodie’s medical condition further portrays the relationship between the black and white races. The first time Dodie falls ill, he â€Å"breathed heavily, with a strange, whistling noise.† (Chesnutt, 44) His condition was far from comfortable, and the foreign object rested inShow MoreRelatedThe Wilmington Riots Of 1898845 Words   |  4 Pagesof the Civil War, the struggle between the black and white races is far from over. The white race insists on maintaining complete control in every aspect of society, including personal matters. They are constantly demanding that the black community serve them. On the other end, the black race is struggling to survive the harsh conditions the white-dominated society imposes on them. Throughout the novel, Chesnutt reminds us of the ongoing battle between the two races. At the same time, Chesnutt exploresRead MoreAnalysis Of The Novel Chesnutt Uses Mixed Race Characters 1675 Words   |  7 PagesIn the novel, Chesnutt uses mixed race characters, which have both black and white ancestors and these characters display the conflicts between black and white societies. Within the novel, Janet Miller is the best example of a mixed race character. Janet’s father was from the white aristocracy, while her mother was a slave and a servant. Janet is emotionally hurt because she doesn t receive the same affection like white half-sister. She views herself as black and submits to the segregation of the

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

PLASTIC NOT PAPER Essay Example For Students

PLASTIC NOT PAPER Essay Walking through the grocery store I always try to look for the best buy. I always buy whats on sale, I guess you could say Im cheep. Then I get to thecheck out lane, preferably the one with fewer people. I empty my wallet and pay. Then I wait. I think its going to happen but I am not sure. Then it does,the baggier says, Would you like paper or plastic? I look that person rightin the eye and I tell him, I want the one thats better for the environment, Iwant the one that will help prevent pollution, I want the one that cost less, Iwant plastic. Plastic bags save money, they conserve energy, they arepractical and they are better for the environment. Thats why plastic bags arethe best choice at the check out line. Of course your wondering how plastic bagssave money, well just think 2,000 paper bags stacked on each other reaches aheight of about 7.25 inches, while paper reaches a soaring height of 7.5 feet. This means it takes seven trucks to deliver the same amount of paper as oneplastic delivering truck. Talk about a big waste of gas. Plastic bags costabout of a cent to make, while paper cost close to 3 cents. This is money wesave as well as the store owner.This is a lot of money that is going towaste considering that plastic bags are so much more practical then paper. Youcan use them for lots of other things. You can take on trips to the grocerystore, your can protect dry clothing from wet towels in an exercise bag. Youcan line your house hold waste basket with them, you tote dry shoes to work onrainy days. Hold plastic, aluminum and glass for recycling. Plastic bags arealso very practical to carry. You can carry 5 compared with 2 paper bags. Plastic bags also hold just as many items as paper. This is also very practicalbecause you can get your groceries out of your car a lot faster, after allgrocery shopping is not the most fun thing to do. A study by FranklinAssociates LTD analyzed the environmental impacts of plastic and unbleachedpaper bag through out there life cycles. They found that plastic grocery bagsconserve 40% less energy, 80% less solid waste,70% less atmospheric emissions,and release up to 95% fewer water born wastes. All these things are naturalresources that we have to cons erve and cant afford to lose. The brown paperbags used in most grocery stores are made from virgin paper without anycontributions from recycled materials. Paper making pollutes the water,releases dioxins, contributing to acid rain and cost trees lives. Weird as itmay sound some virgin paper can be more damaging to wildlife than plasticsubstances, like 6pack rings. If you choose paper over plastic you aresupporting higher levels of pollution. The choice of plastic over paper doesntseem to be that big of a decision, but as you now know it does effect theenvironment. If you dont care about the environment then use the plastic bagsfor there great other practical uses. So the next time you are at the check outlane and you get asked the question, say plastic with pride.

Thursday, April 9, 2020

The Renaissance and Moliere Persuasive Essay Example For Students

The Renaissance and Moliere Persuasive Essay The French word renaissance is equivalent to rebirth in English. The time period named for this term was indeed a rebirth of the creativity and human spirit lost with the classical age. Most importantly, the Renaissance was a revival of an interest to learn. In many ways, it is the opposite of the preceding Middle Ages. Their world revolved around the Roman Catholic Church; belief in god dictated every aspect of life. On the contrary, the Renaissance was secular and emphasized the predominance of individuality and human values, known as humanism. We will write a custom essay on The Renaissance and Moliere Persuasive specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now However rigid or dark the Middle Ages may seem, they were essential for setting the stage for the Renaissance. In 1095, Pope Urban II launched what he called a holy war. This war, issued to regain control of the Holy Land from the Muslims, occurred from 1095 to 1099 and became known as the First Crusade. The Second Crusade began in 1144 with hopes of recapturing the City of Odessa, and it ended in 1149 without having accomplished what it was intended for. The third and final crusade (1189-1192) was organized to take Jerusalem back from the Muslim leader, Slain, also failing to accomplish its original goal. However, there is a reason the Crusades are recognized as history most successful failure The impacts of these religious wars were as influential as it gets. Women had opportunities to manage affairs with the men away at war. The ships that transported crusaders were used by merchants to bring back goods such as tea, coffee, sugar, spices, crops, and silk. Europeans saw these as exotic, which stimulated an interest in trade, especially between Europe and Southwest Asia. This increased trade was one of the most prominent attributes of the High Middle Ages. It was also vital for paving the way for the Renaissance. With expanding trade came prosperity for Europe, specifically Italy, along with new trading cities. The fast growth of such business is labeled as the Commercial Revolution. The revolution enabled European towns to grow, and guilds (worker unions) to develop. When serfs recognized opportunity in trade, they abandoned their lords, and a middle class developed. Together, these factors broke down Feudalism The surge of trade and commerce in the High Middle Ages led to a widespread increase in knowledge. Literature became more accessible, and was written in vernacular dative language, as opposed to Latin. This made it so that a wider variety of people could become literate. Before, only the wealthy could read and write. Universities were established, and the curriculum covered arithmetic, grammar, music, and drama. The High Middle Ages was the peak of the Medieval Era. However, the late Middle Ages seemed to be comprised of disaster and turmoil. Pope Boniface VIII and King Phillip IV of France collided, leading to the Great Schism. By the time this split in the church ceased with the election of Martin V in 1417, the papacy had already been greatly weakened. The bubonic plague hit Europe hard, leading to the death of 25 million of its people. The prayers of the Church failed to stop the plague, which further lowered its prestige. The Black Death ripped apart the fabric of society. However grim the Plague was, it certainly lent itself to the development of the Renaissance. The late Middle Ages were a terrifying time to be alive, and the survivors wanted to celebrate human spirit and individuality. This newfound outlook Renaissance. The people of Italy originally hoped to reawaken the culture of Classical Rome and Greece, however in the process they discovered new styles of art and iterate, along with new values such as humanism. .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f , .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .postImageUrl , .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f , .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f:hover , .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f:visited , .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f:active { border:0!important; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f:active , .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u8b96682899bb4fa2924ecdf6b69b715f:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: English Renaissance TheatreThis time period originated in Italy due to its prosperous cities and merchant class, but soon the rest of Europe was under its influence. Merchants saw the best opportunities lay in the field of the arts, and they soon flourished. The arts also became less secular, drama in particular. Religious plays saw their demise when interludes led to the rebirth of theater. Moldier dean Baptists Opaquely) was a French playwright, actor, and director. Born on January 15 1622, he dedicated himself entirely to the theater until his tragic death in 673. He composed 12 of the most lasting comedies in history, and rose to fame with the publication of his first play, The Precious Maidens Ridiculed (1659). He was known as the most popular comic playwright of his time. His comedy was secular, and the clergy even believed that some of his plays were intended as attacks at the church. They went so far as to ban one of his works. The last of his pieces was The Imaginary Invalid (1673), which he wrote while ill from a lung condition. After the fourth performance of this play, Moldier collapsed on stage, coughing up blood, while laying the lead role, Organ, and died later that day. As in much of Molders work, The Imaginary Invalid (El Malady imaginary) showcases a good amount of Comedic delegate themes and techniques, such as stock characters the three most pronounced of these figures were the servant, master, and inamorata (lovers). The play is a satire of the medical field, as the lead, Organ, is a classic hypochondriac. His daughter Angelic is an Inamorata (a lover), her partner being the man she wishes to marry. Organ has plans for her to marry a doctor, seeing as hes ill and a doctor in the family would benefit himself. Their maid Continent is the equivalent of a Comedic servant. The Imaginary Invalid showcases certain ideals of the Renaissance, such as the importance of each individual, and that the greatest part of being human is the humans free will to choose. Angelic comes to her father expecting to have his blessing in her marrying the man of her dreams. Organ seems to be more than willing to consent, even satisfied with what he has heard of the man, until they gather that they are not talking about the same person. Before the Renaissance, there was no compromise the only word that mattered was the fathers. The plays controversial comedy also reflected values of the Renaissance. It was a source of entertainment produced for peoples enjoyment regardless of the Churchs disapproval. While contrasting to the celebrated Renaissance, the Middle Ages were essential for setting the stage for the remarkable era. The Renaissance remains an impressive time period, considering the immense growth of human knowledge and achievements. The arts held a position of utmost importance, and they allowed people to express themselves in many ways. This feeds directly into the number one new value of the time: humanism.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Alloy Definition and Examples in Chemistry

Alloy Definition and Examples in Chemistry An alloy is a substance made by melting two or more elements together, at least one of them metal. An alloy crystallizes upon cooling into a solid solution, mixture, or intermetallic compound. The components of alloys cannot be separated using a physical means. An alloy is homogeneous and retains the properties of a metal, even though it may include metalloids or nonmetals in its composition. Alternate Spellings: alloys, alloyed Alloy Examples Examples of alloys include stainless steel, brass, bronze, white gold, 14k gold, and  sterling silver. Although exceptions exist, most alloys are named for their primary or base metal, with an indication of other elements in order of mass percent. Uses of Alloys Over 90% of metal used is in the form of alloys. Alloys are used because their chemical and physical properties are superior for an application than that of the pure element components. Typical improvements include corrosion resistance, improved wear, special electrical or magnetic properties, and heat resistance. Other times, alloys are used because they retain the key properties of component metals, yet are less expensive. Example Alloys Steel: the name given to an alloy of iron with carbon, usually with other elements, such as nickel and cobalt. The other elements add a desired quality to the steel, such as hardness or tensile strength.Stainless Steel: another iron alloy, which typically contains chromium, nickel, and other elements to resist rust or corrosion.18k Gold: this is 75% gold. The other elements typically include copper, nickel, or zinc. This alloy retains the color and luster of pure gold, yet is harder and stronger, making it better suited for jewelry.Pewter: an alloy of tin, with other elements such as copper, lead, or antimony. The alloy is malleable, yet stronger than pure tin, plus it resists the phase change of tin that can make it crumble at low temperatures.Brass: a mixture of copper with zinc and sometimes other elements. Brass is hard and durable, making it suitable for plumbing fixtures and machined parts.Sterling Silver: is 92.5% silver with copper and other metals. Alloying silver makes it h arder and more durable, although the copper tends to lead to greenish-black oxidation (tarnish). Electrum: Some alloys, like electrum, occur naturally. This alloy of silver and gold was highly prized by ancient man.Meteoritic Iron: While meteorites may consist of any number of materials, some are natural alloys of iron and nickel, with extraterrestrial origins. These alloys were used by ancient cultures to make weapons and tools.Amalgams: These are mercury alloys. The mercury makes the alloy much like a paste. Amalgams may be used in  dental fillings, with the mercury intact, although another use is to spread the amalgam and then heat it to vaporize the mercury, leaving a coating of another metal.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Why was the Washington consensus irresistible in Latin America Essay

Why was the Washington consensus irresistible in Latin America - Essay Example Within the current globalized system, the importance of international political economy and the means by which decisions of economic importance are engaged, the overall level of relevance is maximized. As a function of this, the following analysis will engage the reader with an understanding of why the â€Å"Washington Consensus† came to be so widely accepted and agreed upon by a litany of different Latin American countries. Although merely referencing the Washington Consensus, and the determinants that it necessarily imposes, would be an effective start, the analysis will also integrate with an in-depth discussion of each of the 10 points which engenders the Washington consensus as a means of understanding the ultimate attraction that so many Latin American countries had to this particular economic integration and approach (Marangos, 2008). Further, the unique drawbacks and tacit inabilities that the Washington Consensus will also be discussed with regards to the way in which stakeholders within this particular issue realize that it was in their best interest to accept the Washington consensus even with its tacit level of drawbacks. ... cit level of understanding with respect to world affairs, international relations, and political theory will necessarily be engaged and hopefully understood (Arestis, 2004). History/Background Firstly, before delving into the ultimate rationale behind why so many Latin American countries chose to integrate so fully and completely with Washington consensus, it must be understood that key macro economic factors throughout Latin America provoked and invoked a level of greater cooperation and willingness to attempt a different approach than might have been realized that any other point in history (Babb, 2013). By the time of the 1980s, Latin America, in addition to much of the rest of the world, was still reeling from the economic repercussions of the global malaise that had existed for almost a decade during the 1970s. Whereas the United States, and the rest of the world for that matter, felt the impact of the drastic increase in fuel costs that took place during the late 1970s and earl y 1980s, the impact that this had upon developing nations were even more profound (Duncan, 2003). This stands to reason due to the fact that the United States and other developed nations had a level of wealth that could be leveraged against a sudden price fluctuation with respect to a inelastic demand. What ultimately prompted the oil crisis during the 1970s had to do with the rising levels of debt, inaccessibility of foreign credit, and a restriction in global trade (Ruckert, 2006). Whereas the fuel crisis of the 1970s and early 1980s was of course of relevance, it must further be understood that this particular issue was a significant impact with regards to developing nations around the world; especially Latin American countries. The rationale behind this is due to the fact that Latin